Tag Archives: workplace harassment

No relief for victims of harassment – Ont CA

22 Jul

I’ve written here about the difficult position an employer/organization is placed in when its employees are harassed by “outsiders.” On July 20th the Court of Appeal for Ontario illustrated the difficulty by affirming a decision that denied relief from such harassment that a municipality (and its mayor) sought on behalf of the mayor, councillors and staff. The decision suggests that an employer’s duty to provide a safe and harassment free environment provides no basis for a civil remedy. 

Rainy River (Town) v. Olsen, 2017 ONCA 605.

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Arbitrator orders $25,000 in damages for privacy breach

19 Jun

Arbitrator Stout’s April 28th decision has received ample coverage, but I’d like this site to be a relatively complete repository of privacy damages awards. Mr. Stout ordered an employer to pay $25,000 in general damages after a supervisor disclosed an employee’s visual disability to three other employees after learning of the disability in a prior arbitration proceeding. The supervisor apologized orally and in writing, which presumably mitigated the breach. He did not testify, however, and Mr. Stout inferred that the disclosure was undertaken as retaliation for the outcome of the prior arbitration, a significant aggravating factor. The grievor also suffered distress that required him to undergo medical treatment and the employer “did very little” to remedy the breach in its response (e.g., discipline on the supervisor).

Canadian Pacific Railway Company v Teamsters Canada Rail Conference, 2016 CanLII 25247 (ON LA).

Arbitrator awards privacy damages for implying an employee suffered from mental distress

31 Dec

On December 4th, Arbitrator Andrew Sims ordered the Edmonton Police Service to pay a grievor $5,000 in damages for breach of privacy.

The case arises out of the Service’s handling of an intense interpersonal conflict between the grievor, a police detective, and his staff sergeant. The conflict led to a formal review in which the reviewing investigator recommended the grievor’s transfer to a new unit due to interpersonal problems, the responsibility for which was borne by the grievor and others. Before the Service addressed the recommendation, however, the grievor and his staff sergeant had an altercation.

The altercation invited an immediate decision to pursue the recommended transfer. Although the formal review had raised no concerns about the grievor’s mental health, when superintendent met with the grievor to advise him of the transfer she became concerned about his mental health on account of his reaction.

The superintendent raised the need for a psychological assessment, which the grievor undertook grudgingly but voluntarily. While this assessment was pending the superintendent met with the department and implied that the grievor was mentally unwell, in essence conveying the same opinion that was the basis for the pending assessment. In the end, a psychologist determined the grievor was “psychologically intact and functional.”

Based on the following analysis, Arbitrator Sims ordered the Service to pay $5,000 in damages:

Had the Employer described to a work group a physician’s diagnosis of a co-worker, that it had obtained in its role as employer, disclosure would clearly be a breach of the employee’s right to privacy of their personal medical information.  To anticipate a diagnosis, based only on personal observations, however genuine the concerns,and to discuss that in public, is just as serious a breach of privacy.  Arrangements were underway to get the grievor assessed.  Implying anything as to his state of health pending that assessment was inappropriate and unnecessary. The decision was made to transfer the grievor based on the problems he was having with his Staff Sergeant and the Unit Review.  This was decided before the health concerns arose from the interview.  Given that, there was really no need to go into whether the grievor had health issues at all. The emphasis on the grievors “H.R. issues” had the effect of adding undue emphasis to the suggestion that the broader issues in the unit, which were serious in themselves, were due to the grievor’s health issues.  That too was unjustified given the more balanced assessment in the unit review itself.  The grievor’s reputation amongst his peers, his need and ability to interact with them in future, and his sense of employment security were all impacted by the excessive commentary during this meeting.  While I accept that the comments were made out of genuine (although to a significant degree unfounded) concern, they amounted to a breach of privacy and caused harm to the grievor’s privacy interests. Police officers are particularly dependent upon their reputation amongst their peers.  Any suggestion of mental problems or unreliability can seriously hurt their working relationships and their careers.  I find these breaches of privacy sufficiently serious to justify financial compensation which, based on a review of the authorities discussed above, I award at $5,000.

Edmonton Police Service v Edmonton Police Association, 2014 CanLII 73072 (AB GAA).

Case Report – Wrongful dismissal plaintiff can discover his former subordinate about her harassment complaint

20 Sep

On September 3rd, Strathy J. held that it was not improper for a wrongful dismissal plaintiff to conduct oral discovery of a former subordinate whose harassment complaint led to his termination.

The plaintiff sought to examine the complainant, and the employer moved for an order directing the examintion of the human resoruces manager who had conducted the harassment investigation instead.

Strathy J., hearing an appeal of a master’s order, dismissed the employer’s argument that the choice was improper because the complainant did not participate in the decision to terminate and had no knowledge of the corporate imperatives underlying the decision. Strathy J. held that the request was “rational” and made for a proper purpose and held that the plaintiff would be prejudiced by being deprived of an opportunity to examine the person whose evidence “goes to the heart of the case.” Strathy J. also noted that the plaintiff’s counsel had undertaken that the complainant need not prepare herself for examination on issues of which she had no personal knowledge, said he would be happy to receive undertakings on such issues and suggested that he would be willing to examine the complainant without the plaintiff present.

Ciardullo v. Premetalco Inc., 2009 CanLII 45445 (ON S.C.).