Case Report – Use of meta tags and passing off

17 Aug

On July 7th the Ontario Superior Court of Justice dismissed a motion for an interlocutory injunction brought, in part, on a breach of confidence claim. 

The treatment of the confidentiality claim is very fact-specific.  Not surprisingly, Madam Justice Low held that it would not be reasonable for her to draw an inference that a company that developed and hosted an online retailer’s website misused the retailer’s confidential information merely because it had started a directly competitive business (in the adult footed pajama market, if you care).

Although intellectual property is beyond the scope of my real interest (and what I will normally speak to in this blog), you may be interested in Madam Justice Low’s obiter comments about the defendant’s improper use of the plaintiff’s trade name as a meta tag.  She said:

It seems to me that an obvious (though not necessarily the only) reason for FOW’s use of the phrase “Jumpin Jammerz” as a meta tag for its website was to draw members of the internet public to its site who had some prior knowledge of Jumpin Jammerz as a vendor of pajamas and believed that they could find footed pajamas at the website associated with the words “Jumpin Jammerz”.

***

Had it been necessary, I would have made an order restraining the use of the phrase “Jumpin Jammerz” as a meta tag in association with FOW’s  website in these circumstances given that the phrase is not descriptive of the wares and an arguable case could be made that its use as a meta tag was for the purpose of diverting or luring members of the public to a site that was not in fact connected with the business known as Jumpin Jammerz at all. It was not necessary, however, for the motion to be pursued on this issue, as the defendants have removed the meta tags to which the plaintiffs objected and do not assert an intention or desire to recommence using them.

The defendant had agreed to remove the offending tag from its website, thereby making an order unnecessary.

Pandi v. Fieldofwebs.com, 2007 CanLII 27028 (Ont. S.C.J.).

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