Four data security points for pandemic planners who are addressing the coronavirus

Organizations currently engaged in pandemic planning ought to consider the data and cybersecurity risks associated with the rapid adoption of telework. Planning should start now, with the following considerations in mind.

Remote access risks. Secure remote access should continue to be a requirement. In general, this means access through a virtual private network and multi-factor authentication. Though understandable, “band aid” solutions to enable remote access that depart from this requirement represent a significant risk. Some departure may be necessary, though all risks should be measured. In general, any solution that rests on the use of remote desktop protocol over the internet should be considered very high risk.

Data leakage risks. Efforts should be made to keep all data classified as non-public on the organization’s systems. This can be established by issuing hardware to take home or through secure remote access technology. The use of personal hardware is an option that should used together with a well-considered BYOD policy. Printing and other causes of data leakage should be addressed through administrative policy or direction. Consider providing direction on where and how to conduct telephone calls in a confidential manner.

Credential risks. New classes of workers may need to be issued new credentials. Although risks related to poor credential handling can be mitigated by the use of multi-factor authentication, clear and basic direction on password use may be warranted. Some have said that phishing attacks may increase in light of an increase in overall vulnerability as businesses deploy new systems and adjust. While speculative, a well-timed reminder of phishing risks may help.

Incident response risks. Quite simply, will your incident response plan still function when the workforce is dispersed and when key decision-makers may be sick? Who from IT will be responsible for coming on-site? How long will that take? If decision-makers are sick, who will stand in? These questions are worth asking now.

Hat tip to my colleague Matin Fazelpour for his input on this post.