Cyber defence basics – Maritime Connections

I was pleased to do a cyber defence basics presentation to privacy professionals attending the Public Service Information Community Connection “Maritime Connections” event yesterday. The presentation (below) is based off of recent publications by the New York Department of Financial Services and the Information Commissioner’s Office (UK) as as the (significant) Coveware Q3 ransomware report.

As I said to the attendees, I am not a technical expert and no substitute for one, but those of us outside of IT and IT security who work in this space (along with the predominantly non-technical management teams we serve) must engage with the key technical concepts underpinning IT security if we are to succeed at cyber defence.

I’ll do an updated version next week at Saskatchewan Connections next week. Join us!

The twelve security failures underscoring the ICO’s recent £500,000 fine

On February 10th the Information Commissioner’s Office fined Cathay Pacific £500,000 for breaching the security principle established under the UK Data Protection Act. Here are the twelve security failures that were the basis of the finding (with underlined text in the ICO’s words plus my annotation):

    • The database backups were not encrypted. The ICO said this was a departure from company policy undertaken due to a data migration project, but a company approval and risk mitigation requirement was apparently not followed.
    • The internet-facing server was accessible due to a known and publicized vulnerability. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure website listed the vulnerability approximately seven years before it was exploited, said the ICO.
    • The administrator console was publicly accessible via the internet. This was done to facilitate vendor access, without a risk assessment according to the ICO. The ICO said the company ought to have used a VPN to enable vendor access.
    • System A was hosted on an operating system that was (and is) no longer supported. The ICO noted that the company neither replaced the system or purchased extended support.
    • Cathay Pacific could not provide evidence of adequate server hardening.
    • Network users were permitted to authenticate past the VPN without multi-factor authentication. The ICO noted that this allowed the attackers to mis-use stolen credentials (pertaining to a 41,000 user base).
    • The anti-virus protection was inadequate. This was apparently due to operating system comparability problems (on an operating system other than the legacy system on System A).
    • Patch management was inadequate. Logs were missing on some systems, the ICO said. It also noted that one server was missing 16 updates that resolved publicly known vulnerabilities, 12 of which were described as “easily exploitable.”
    • Forensic evidence was no longer available during the Commissioner ‘s investigation. The ICO said that servers images analyzed in the post-incident investigation were not retained and provided to the ICO.
    • Accounts were given inappropriate privileges. “Day-to-day” user accounts were given administrator privileges according to the ICO.
    • Penetration  testing  was  inadequate. The ICO said three years without penetration testing was inadequate given the quantity and nature of the information at issue, which included passport numbers.
    • Retention periods were too long. It appears (though is not clear) that transaction data was preserved indefinitely and that user data was purged after seven years of inactivity.

£500,000 is the maximum fine. The ICO said it was warranted, in part, because the failures related to “fundamental principles.” The failure to retain evidence was another notable factor.