Tag Archives: data breach

How to manage a data security incident – Ten tips from a breach practitioner

25 Sep

Here’s a slide deck (including speaking notes) for a presentation I did today at LegalTech Toronto.

I aimed for something practical on the art of breach response by speaking to these ten tips:

  1. Initiate response ASAP
  2. Don’t rest on assumptions
  3. Keep the ball moving
  4. Don’t rush
  5. Obtain objective input
  6. Obtain technical input
  7. Take a broad view of notification
  8. Put yourself in their shoes
  9. Demonstrate commitment to doing better
  10. Apologize

Enjoy!

Ontario arbitration award addresses remedy for privacy violation

21 Apr

On February 24th the Grievance Settlement Board (Ontario) held that an employer should provide a grievor with three days’ paid vacation as a remedy for the consequences of an (admitted) security breach. The breach apparently allowed other employees to read incident reports involving the grievor, who alleged this caused him psychological distress. The GSB made its finding after conducting an informal med-arb process.

Ontario Public Service Employees Union (Grievor) v Ontario (Liquor Control Board of Ontario), 2015 CanLII 14198 (ON GSB).

IPC tweaks data security guidance from HO-013

30 Jan

Yesterday the Information & Privacy Commissioner/Ontario issued a paper called “Detecting and Deterring Unauthorized Access to Personal Health Information.” The paper adjusts and augments the detailed guidance on hospital data security the IPC provided in December when it issued HO-013.

In issuing HO-013 the IPC articulated numerous requirements in near checklist form. The IPC adds new requirements in Detecting and Deterring. Hospitals that are currently using HO-013 to conduct a gap analysis should now refer to Detecting and Deterring.

One exception to the augmentation is the IPC’s handing of “search controls” – controls that rest on limiting the search functionality of patient record systems. The IPC has backed off noticeably from HO-013 in Detecting and Deterring, which states:

With respect to search controls, it is important to note that open-ended search functionality may facilitate unauthorized access to personal health information in electronic information systems. For example, in the privacy breach involving the use and disclosure of personal health information for the purpose of selling or marketing RESPs, agents of the hospital were able to obtain lists of women who had recently given birth by performing open-ended searches of a patient index. To prevent this, custodians should ensure that the amount of personal health information that is displayed as a result of a search query is limited, while still enabling agents to carry out their employment, contractual or other duties. Open-ended searches for individuals should be prohibited by the search functionality and search capabilities of electronic information systems containing personal health information. Ideally, electronic information systems should be configured to ensure that search criteria return only one record of personal health information. If that is not feasible, then electronic information systems should be configured so that no more than five records of personal health information are displayed as a result of a search query.

The withdrawal makes sense. Search controls can put patient safety at risk, yet even rigid search controls are a questionable deterrent to intentional unauthorized access. Are bad actors really more likely to engage in unauthorized access because information is easy to find?

Hospitals should beware of the distinction between prescriptions that are recommendatory and prescriptions the IPC has the power to enforce. This is most important in considering the heavily-augmented breach response section of Deterring and Detecting. The IPC, for example, returns to an accountability-related idea it has pressed since making order HO-010 in 2010 by suggesting that hospitals should provide affected individuals with the name of “the agent that caused the privacy breach” in a breach notification letter. The IPC has the power to enforce breach response requirements that are derived from section 12 of PHIPA. A number of the prescriptions it makes on breach response (not necessarily the one I have identified above) have a tenuous connection to section 12 and can reasonably be viewed as recommendatory.

HO, HO, HO-013 – Big order for Ontario hospitals lands just before the holidays

20 Dec

On December 16th the Information and Privacy Commissioner/Ontario issued its 13th order under the Personal Health Information Protection Act. It contains very detailed prescriptions pertaining to the PHIPA data security standard in section 12. The standard is contextual – i.e., the standard of care is always based on all the “circumstances.” However, given Ontario hospitals face similar foreseeable risks, hospitals should pay very close heed to the prescriptions in HO-013.

I’ll spare you a description of the background and get to the point. Here is a bulleted summary of the data security prescriptions in HO-13. Rather than describe each in detail I will give you very short (synthesized) descriptions and page references.

  1. Ensure that patient information systems support audits and investigations of system misuse. Collect reliable data on all access, copying, disclosure, modification and disposal of patient records. Retain data for a reasonable period of time. Pages 23 to 29.
  2. Conduct periodic audits for patient information system misuse: “Audits are essential technical safeguards for electronic information systems.” Conduct random audits on all system activity. Run a special audit program for “high profile” patients. Pages 32 to 34.
  3. Ensure that patient information systems feature reasonable search controls. Search controls should limit the ability of agents to perform “open-ended” searches. Pages 29 to 32.
  4. Ensure that patient information systems feature a login notice that appears on its own screen and requires express acknowledgement. Page 22.
  5. Conduct regular and comprehensive privacy training pursuant to a privacy training program policy. Require pre-authorization training and annual re-training. Training materials should be detailed and contain certain information prescribed in HO-013. Pages 34 to 36.
  6. Communicate regularly about privacy compliance and compliance duties pursuant to a privacy awareness program policy. Page 36.
  7. Administer a “pledge of confidentiality” that contains certain information prescribed in HO-013. Require agents to sign pre-authorization and annually. Pages 37 and 38.
  8. Maintain and administer a privacy breach management policy that meets particular requirements specified in HO-013. Pages 40 and 41.

Most hospitals will already have data security programs that feature many of the elements in the list above. Regardless, there are detailed requirements in HO-013 (not included in the summary above) that invite hospitals to conduct a broad gap analysis. Some gaps are likely to be closed easily and others may require the investment of additional ongoing resources – e.g., gaps with respect to training and communication programming. The most problematic prescriptions in HO-013 are those related to the modification of patient information systems. The prescriptions regarding search controls, for example, seem problematic and may create system usability (search) problems. The responding hospital did raise concerns about usability that the IPC dismissed.

Order HO-013 (IPC Ontario).

The science of breach prevention and the art of breach response

21 Mar

Data loss prevention and response is a big topic now! The HRSDC lost hard drive is about a huge (but seemingly benign) incident that has attracted great attention. We also have the Obama administration’s attention to corporate network security – such attention given at a time in which sacrifices are being made to corporate network security based on trends such as BYOD.

Here is a practical guide that we’ve prepared to address the salient issues. We hope it’s useful to you.